Deworming Horses

The goal of deworming should be to limit the number of parasite so that our animals enjoy optimum health. It’s virtually impossible to eliminate parasites completely. In fact, frequent use of deworming drugs will create resistance by the parasites to the drugs, meaning the drugs will become increasingly less effective. This same ‘thinning the herd’ occurs with antibiotics also. So, we should practice deworming with a careful strategy, ideally with the direction of a local equine vet.

What we at Hawthorne Country Store have learned is:

  1. The most professional deworming program begins with a fecal egg count to determine each horse’s apparent worm population, (high medium, or low).
  2. Some horses have more natural immunity to most parasites than others. This immunity isn’t fully developed until about 3 years old. The first year is the most important to minimized parasites, especially round worms. So a foal deworming schedule is more frequent than a mature horse.
  3. An adult horse without worm symptoms, not kept on a grass pasture with other horses, always having been in our warm, dry climate, and with frequent manure cleanup and not a heavy shedder of worm eggs may do well with only annual deworming.
  4. A horse under 3 years old, or with worm infestation symptoms, or in an irrigated pasture with other horses where manure stays in the pasture, or a horse moved in from a wet climate or a heavy shedder of worm eggs may be best served with 4 de-wormings per year as with a foal’s schedule.
  5. If a parasite volume is great enough, it can harm internal organs, lower resistance to other infections and even, rarely, cause death.
  6. But, know that parasites have always been in horses; our goal is to maintain the best health, and that requires plentiful, clean water, the right, quality feed, clean air and exercise, and a parasite control program.


Farnham horse supplies

farnham horse supplies

Straight Arrow horse supplies

straight arrow horse supplies